Pat Kennedy - Your Washington, DC Real Estate Connection

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Raising CYA to an Art Form

I wrote an offer on a condominium in Columbia Heights that was a new condo conversion, and we had to use the contract boilerplate prescribed by the developer.  And there was this one paragraph that sort of laid out in some detail what should have been totally obvious to anyone making an offer:

  • This property is in an urban area.
  • There could be derelicts sitting on your stoop when you get home from a hard day at the office.
  • There might be a drug deal or two (or maybe more) taking place in the alley that you can see from your kitchen window.
  • Air quality could be funky at times.
  • There could be noise outside of the building.
  • There could be noise from your neighbors inside the building.
  • Your car could get broken into.
  • Your apartment could get broken into. 
  • You might get mugged.

These were not their exact words, but this was the gist of the clause. 

What amazed me was that the developer felt the need to state the obvious.

OK, Columbia Heights is still sort of an emerging neighborhood.  A decade or go, this area had a very high funk factor, but with the new subway station, the neighborhood has become increasingly gentrified.  But in any neighborhood in any city, you have to use common sense. 

Whether you are in Georgetown, Crestwood, Spring Valley or Chevy Chase, there are occasional bad guys on the streets, noisy neighbors and funky air quality - though perhaps no derelicts on the front porch.

But to me the clause was very much stating the obvious - the very obvious. 

And I had to ask, is this really necessary?  And I remembered that Washington does have an awful lot to lawyers!

If you are planning a move to or from the Washington, DC area, I can help.  Call, email or text me at:

Housepat@mac.com

202-549-5167

Licensed in DC, Virginia and Maryland

Comment balloon 30 commentsPatricia Kennedy • April 20 2011 11:01PM
Raising CYA to an Art Form
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I wrote an offer on a condominium in Columbia Heights that was a new condo conversion, and we had to use the contract boilerplate prescribed by the developer. And there was this one paragraph that sort of laid out in some detail what should have… more